REVIEW album Old Subbacultcha Old Subbacultcha

The Hazey Janes deliver a homely album of tuneful, heartfelt songs

Old Subbacultcha

Old Subbacultcha



The Hazey Janes release new record 'Language of Faint Theory', out now on Armellodie Records.

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The Hazey Janes have racked up a fair helping of travelling miles over the years, supporting many a musical monolith along the way (the likes of Wilco, Elbow, Snow Patrol). The Dundonian troupe release their fourth studio album and all this touring seems to have served them well. Language of Faint Theory is the work of a band that know where they’ve been and where they’re want to go. Drawing on country, pop and indie inspirations, they’ve created a homely album of tuneful, heartfelt songs. The album was recorded using analogue methods, attaining that certain warmth, that i-don’t-know-what that emanates from analog equipment and vinyl. The sound is assured and clean and smooth as a baby’s arse. To describe the sound as sentimental sounds a bit shmoozy but with the lyrics ringing about home there is an integrity and genuine admiration of their roots. Tracks like ‘The Fathom Line’ ring out with indie-pop bubbliness with a touch of wavy country twang. It’s anthemic and ambitious in its energy. It has a certain grandeur about it, like a golden cruise ship speeding through summer waters in slow motion. The best tracks come towards the end of the album for me, with the closing track Bellefield Moon's shivering strings leaving you delicate. A bit like a melancholic aperitif at the bar, perhaps a Scots single malt. Language of Faint Theory is out now on Armellodie Records.

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